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Permlink Replies: 21 - Last Post: Nov 8, 2011 11:08 PM Last Post By: SereneMaxine
Turtletoes2


Posts: 4,260
Pasties
Posted: Sep 9, 2011 9:24 AM
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Does anyone here make or have a recipe for Pasties ? They are like little meat pies with meat, potatoes , rutabegas, onions, stuff like that. The crust was made with lard. Use to be a staple for copper miners to take to work for lunch. I had an aunt who made them and they were delicious.
SereneMaxine


Posts: 2,190
Re: Pasties
Posted: Sep 9, 2011 7:57 PM   in response to: Turtletoes2 in response to: Turtletoes2
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I can give you a great recipe when I get home from my vacation. We used to make a lard pie crust, but we changed it to a vinegar pie crust. I'll be home in about 2 weeks, so I may need a gentle reminder.
Turtletoes2


Posts: 4,260
Re: Pasties
Posted: Sep 10, 2011 9:23 AM   in response to: SereneMaxine in response to: SereneMaxine
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I'll look foreward to it and try to remember.
Karen411


Posts: 386
Re: Pasties
Posted: Sep 9, 2011 8:22 PM   in response to: Turtletoes2 in response to: Turtletoes2
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I found all kinds of recipes on the net. Just google " pasties " and all kinds of things will come up. Its an Upper Mich. kind of thing.

Karen
Turtletoes2


Posts: 4,260
Re: Pasties
Posted: Sep 10, 2011 9:25 AM   in response to: Karen411 in response to: Karen411
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So did I but you got it right, it is an Uppper Mich. kind of thing. A chef around here tried to tell me it was from the Bahamas. Not the one I'm interested in.
wanderer


Posts: 5,067
Re: Pasties
Posted: Sep 10, 2011 3:58 PM   in response to: Turtletoes2 in response to: Turtletoes2
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actually it is Cornish - from the miners from Cornwall that populated the Yoop. they are sometimes served with gravy or catsup. delicious. some recipes call for "swede" which in the British Isles is rutabaga.

not to be confused with those little circles dancers wear :)
Karen411


Posts: 386
Re: Pasties
Posted: Sep 10, 2011 4:28 PM   in response to: wanderer in response to: wanderer
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What's Yoop ? Googled it and found several interesting links.

I learn more things by doing this; its interesting to see the cultures in different parts of the US
WELSie

Posts: 684
Re: Pasties
Posted: Sep 10, 2011 7:28 PM   in response to: Karen411 in response to: Karen411
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The Yoop is a place inhabited by Yoopers - the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, where they speak Yooper, eh? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yooper_dialect. Yoop = UP I had a pasty in England this past summer, and it was pretty good.

Here's a fact about the UP that might be of interest. All Michigan high school students are required to take a standardized test. On a previous version of that test, the UP was identified on a map as a part of Canada.
wanderer


Posts: 5,067
Re: Pasties
Posted: Sep 10, 2011 9:29 PM   in response to: WELSie in response to: WELSie
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yes, Yoop is the pronounciation of the letters U P as in Upper Peninsula. i think most of the dialect is from Finnish as in Negaunee and Ishpeming- used to be a group called Da Yoopers who had funny songs - Rusty Chevrolet and Second Week of Deer Camp were two of their most "famous"?

and the folks from the lower peninsula are called Trolls - cause they live below the bridge. (Or so the joke goes)
Karen411


Posts: 386
Re: Pasties
Posted: Sep 10, 2011 10:16 PM   in response to: wanderer in response to: wanderer
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Ha Ha. My Hubby was born in the Saginaw area. I always knew there was something wrong with him.
Turtletoes2


Posts: 4,260
Re: Pasties
Posted: Sep 12, 2011 10:12 AM   in response to: wanderer in response to: wanderer
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Thanks for explaining to a Detroit gal. what these terms mean. Guess I'm an X troll. Under the bridge, how funny.

The second week of Deer Camp below is a howl.

http://youtu.be/kb9yhhflmvY

So is Rusty Chevrolet. The Yoopers have a number of songs on You Tube that I'm going to check out.
They are a bunch of funny guys .

Turtletoes2


Posts: 4,260
Re: Pasties
Posted: Sep 12, 2011 12:32 PM   in response to: Turtletoes2 in response to: Turtletoes2
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Yoopers have a store and it's online. You can get Yooper caps, shirts, etc. Maybe you may want to think of something there for your husband as a gift. On the other hand , maybe you wouldn't.
GrannyGG

Posts: 186
Re: Pasties
Posted: Sep 12, 2011 1:07 PM   in response to: wanderer in response to: wanderer
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I have read Lilian Jackson Braun's books, the "Cat Who ... She talks about pasties in one or
more of them. The exact location of the towns were never given but I figured they were set
in Upper Michigan because of the miners there.
Smiley1965


Posts: 8,219
Re: Pasties
Posted: Sep 12, 2011 4:04 PM   in response to: GrannyGG in response to: GrannyGG
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A Yooper man wants a job, but the foreman won't hire him until he passes a little math test.

"Here's your first question," the foreman said. "Without using numbers, represent the number 9."

"Without numbers?" the Yooper says, "Dat is easy." And he proceeds to draw three trees.

"What's this?" the foreman asks.

"Ave you got no brain? Tree and tree and tree make nine," says the Yooper.

"Fair enough," says the foreman. "Here's your second question. Use the same rules, but this time the number is 99."

The Yooper stares into space for a while, then picks up the picture that he has just drawn and makes a smudge on each tree
"Ere you go."

The foreman scratches his head and says, "How on earth
do you get that to represent 99?"

"Each of da trees is dirty now. So, it's dirty tree, and dirty tree, and dirty tree. Dat is 99."

The foreman is getting worried that he's going to actually have to hire this Yooper, so he says, "All right, last question. Same rules again, but represent the number 100."

The Yooper stares into space some more, then he picks up the picture again and makes a little mark at the base of each tree and says, "Ere you go. One hundred."

The foreman looks at the attempt. "You must be nuts if you think that represents a hundred!"

The Yooper leans forward and points to the marks at the base of each tree and says, "A little dog came along and **** by each tree. So now you got dirty tree and a turd, dirty tree and a turd, and dirty tree and a turd, dat make one hundred. So, when do I start?"
Karen411


Posts: 386
Re: Pasties
Posted: Sep 12, 2011 6:33 PM   in response to: GrannyGG in response to: GrannyGG
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I know this isn't the book thread, but I love her books.

Karen
GrannyGG

Posts: 186
Re: Pasties
Posted: Sep 12, 2011 8:02 PM   in response to: Karen411 in response to: Karen411
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I have most of her books. I especially liked the ones set in the Pickax area. I read
where Mrs. Braun died in June of this year at age 97.
KayakerGal


Posts: 86
Re: Pasties
Posted: Oct 27, 2011 3:37 PM   in response to: GrannyGG in response to: GrannyGG
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LJB actually had a place outside of Caseville, in Michigan's Thumb area. (Think as far east of Saginaw as you can go without getting wet). It was on the shore line, where many people name their cottages, such as White Pine Cabin, or Seven Oaks Retreat. Braun, with a humorous twist, called hers "No Oaks", it being one of the few lots that had been completely logged over. Her books have a mish-mash of Michigan color, with some aspects borrowed from the Yoop but much of it can actually be seen in Caseville, Pt. Austin, and Bad Axe, the progenitor of Pick Ax. The radio guy with the funny hesitating drawl? He was on the Bad Axe radio station.

I have most of the series, all pawtographed by Koko. They were the only new books promoted by the used book store in Caseville.
Shar M


Posts: 15,893
Re: Pasties
Posted: Sep 14, 2011 8:39 PM   in response to: wanderer in response to: wanderer
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I haven't heard one of those recordings in ages. It seemed like whenever we had a party, the men (hunters all) would always play recordings by the Yooper and hte women would complain. I don't hear them anymore when I'm in Michigan. I think the wives must have found and hidden them.

I have a series of books (eight to be exact) called "The Northwood Reader," and subsequent titles. They are short stories about the Upper Peninsula written under the name of Cully Gage. The author's real name was Charles Van Riper, and he was the son of a physician in the town of Marquette and also physician to the miners. Gage himself was a professor, but I'm not sure where. They are great stories and my boys and I have loved them, even though we were Trolls rather than Yoopers. I always picked one up when visiting Northern Michigan but had to find the last couple on line.
Turtletoes2


Posts: 4,260
Re: Pasties
Posted: Sep 13, 2011 9:11 PM   in response to: wanderer in response to: wanderer
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I bought some Rutabagas and put them in stew. The people at my local supermarket cut it up for me as it is so hard, I'd probably cut my arm off. I first asked them to cut it in 4 parts and the lady said she would cut it up in bits and I said I wanted to peel it so it would be better in 4 parts. She peeled it and cut it up in smaller bits. Now, that's service. Publix super market.
SereneMaxine


Posts: 2,190
Re: Pasties
Posted: Oct 22, 2011 9:09 PM   in response to: Turtletoes2 in response to: Turtletoes2
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Vinegar Pie Crust for Pasties

Mix together: 1 egg, slightly beaten
1 T vinegar
3 T water

Cut together: 3 C flour
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 C shortening

Mix liquid with flour mixture (like any pie crust)

Roll out on floured surface.
Makes 3-5 pasties, depending on the amount of filling. You can use a plate upside-down to cut out a round circle for the filling.

Pastie Filling

1 lb. very lean meat (ground beef, cut up roast, diced chicken, etc.)
4-5 medium potatoes, diced (small pieces)
1 medium onion, chopped
2 carrots, diced

Mix the above together and measure out about one cup per pastie. Place meat mixture on one side of the circle, fold over the other side, seal the edges. Bake 350 for about 45 minutes or until done.

Options: Substitute one small rutabaga for one potato for the Swedish pastie. You can also add a dab of butter on top of the meant filling before folding over the crust.

How to eat? Many people like them with ketchup or gravy. Personally, I only add butter to mine.

Enjoy!
Turtletoes2


Posts: 4,260
Re: Pasties
Posted: Nov 8, 2011 2:11 AM   in response to: SereneMaxine in response to: SereneMaxine
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Thanks so much for recipe. I met someone from Detroit who has recently made them. She said she didn't use lard. She's young. That vinager sound great. Will give it a whirl one of these days.
SereneMaxine


Posts: 2,190
Re: Pasties
Posted: Nov 8, 2011 11:08 PM   in response to: Turtletoes2 in response to: Turtletoes2
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You're welcome for the recipe. Please let us know how your pasties turn out!